I Hurt Myself At The Airport, Can I Sue?

If you were injured in an airport because of negligence, you may be wondering how to sue an airport. When you’re in public spaces you’re owed a duty of care by those in control of the space. 

How to sue an airport
How to sue an airport guide

This guide will talk about the protections that health and safety legislation gives you and explain how personal injury claims work. It will also give you more information on the compensation you could be awarded for your injuries and inform you of the steps you could take to help strengthen your claim. 

If you want to speak to someone about potentially making a claim, our advisers are available and offer free initial consultations. You can reach them now, using: 

  • The number at the top of the page    
  • Our contact page    
  • The live chat feature 

Choose A Section 

  1. How To Sue An Airport For Personal Injury 
  2. How To Sue An Airport For Slips Or Trips 
  3. Examples Of Accidents In An Airport 
  4. How Much Compensation Could I Get In A Claim Against An Airport? 
  5. Is A No Win No Fee Agreement Recommended? 
  6. Learn More About How To Sue An Airport 

How To Sue An Airport For Personal Injury 

As a facility open to public use, airports have to follow public health and safety laws and regulations. The Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957, outlines the responsibility of the people in charge of public spaces (including airports) to ensure the safety of any person that uses their facilities.

The person or party in control of a public space is known as the occupier in legislation. They have a responsibility to look for any hazards and to manage, reduce or remove the risks. If they do not do this, and you are injured as a result, then you could be eligible to sue the airport for compensation. 

If you were injured in an airport because of the negligence of the party in control, reach out to one of our advisers now for information on how to sue an airport. 

How To Sue An Airport For Slips Or Trips 

According to the Health & Safety Executive, slips, trips and falls are the most reported injury to members of the public. Airports should take steps to try and prevent people from suffering injuries as the result of slips or trips.

Actions they can take to prevent people from experiencing slips include: 

  • Signage: Signs warning people of a wet or slippery floor can alert people to the hazard, and encourage them to walk more carefully. Furthermore, if there’s a hazard that can’t be removed, such as a high step, then signs should be in place warning of this. 
  • Housekeeping: Clutter and debris should not be left in walkways, or anywhere that they pose a trip hazard. 
  • Regular checks: Hazards such as broken steps or loose handrails can be dangerous. Performing regular assessments of an area can identify such risks and give those in control an opportunity to address them. 
  • Providing good lighting: Installing lighting over stairways or illuminating walkways at night could help people avoid tripping injuries. 

These are the type of actions Occupiers of a public place are expected to take to try and prevent slips and trips from happening. If you were injured in an airport because of a lack of similar preventative measures, you can reach out to one of our advisers now for information on how to sue an airport for compensation. 

Examples Of Accidents In An Airport 

Below, we’ve included examples of some kinds of accidents that could occur in an airport. They include:

  • Slips, trips and falls. These could cause injuries such as a break or fracture like a broken cheekbone if you were to fall on your face.
  • Being hit by a falling object. Many airports have screens installed high up so that passengers can view their flight information. If one of these screens was in a state of disrepair and fell onto you, you could sustain a concussion or broken hip as a result.
  • A vehicle accident. Sometimes, a small bus will take you from the airport terminal to your plane. If this was to collide with another vehicle or with an object on the tarmac, this could cause you to sustain an injury such as a broken rib or whiplash.

If you suffered an injury in an accident that could have been avoided by adhering to the correct duty of care, you could be eligible to sue the airport and claim compensation. Reach out to one of our advisers now and they could help you begin your claim for compensation if you have a valid claim. 

Evidence 

Evidence of the cause of the accident can help you strengthen your claim. This can come in the form of: 

  • Witnesses: If someone witnessed the accident, collect their contact details as they could be able to provide testimonies for use in your claim 
  • CCTV footage: If your accident was captured on CCTV, you can request the footage to use as evidence in your claim. 
  • Medical records: If you sought medical attention, the records from this report can act as evidence of your injury. 

Medical evidence can be important in a personal injury claim. If you choose to work with a solicitor from our panel, they could arrange a medical assessment local to you as part of your claim. This can let you know more about your condition and medical records and treatment can be used as evidence to support your case. 

Our advisers are available if you want any more information on the use of evidence in personal injury claims, or if you have more general questions on how to sue an airport. 

How Much Compensation Could I Get In A Claim Against An Airport? 

The extent of the injury and the effect it has had on you will influence the amount of compensation you could be awarded in a claim against an airport. 

Compensation in personal injury claims can be comprised of two heads of claim. The first head, general damages, is the amount of compensation you could be awarded to address the pain and distress caused by the injury.

The Judicial College Guidelines (JCG) can be used to help value awards for general damages. The JCG is a collection of guideline compensation brackets for various injuries. 

We’ve included a table containing figures from the JCG below: 

InjuryNotesAward
Moderate Neck Injuries: (iii)Moderate soft tissue injuries with a long recovery time£7,410 to £12,900
Minor Neck Injuries: (Iii)Full recovery within three monthsUp to £2,300
Moderate Back Injuries: (ii) Backache from disturbed ligaments£11,730 to £26,050
Minor Back Injuries: (ii)Full recovery without surgery occurs within three months to two years£2,300 to £7,410
Moderate Shoulder InjuryLimited movement in the shoulder£7,410 to £11,980
Severe Pelvis Injury: (ii)Fracture dislocation of the pelvis£58,100 to £73,580
Less Severe Elbow InjuryImpaired function of the joint that leaves no serious disability£14,690 to £30,050
Severe Leg Injuries: (ii)Injuries permanently affecting use of the leg£51,460 to £85,600
Less Serious Leg Injuries: (i)An incomplete recovery from a fracture£16,860 to £26,050
Severe Knee Injury: (ii)Leg fracture causing constant pain£48,920 to £65,440

The second potential head of claim is special damages. Financial losses you have suffered as a direct result of the injury can be claimed back under special damages. 

This can include: 

  • A loss of income if you could not work 
  • Costs you’ve spent on treatment or care 
  • Adaptations you have had to make to your home or car to cope with the injury 

You should maintain records of the financial losses. Records like receipts or payslips can be used as evidence in your claim. 

For information about how to sue an airport and the potential compensation you could receive, why not reach out to one of our advisers? They offer free legal advice and could potentially value your claim for you. If you have a valid claim, they could provide you with a solicitor from our panel to handle your claim.  

Is A No Win No Fee Agreement Recommended? 

Concerns about large costs can put people off seeking legal representation when claiming after suffering an injury. While a solicitor is not a requirement to make a claim, using one will be beneficial. They can offer experience and aid in every part of the process of making a claim.

A No Win No Fee agreement is a way to enlist a solicitor without having to worry about upfront costs. Under the agreement, you would only pay fees to your solicitor if your claim was successful and you were awarded compensation. If your claim was not successful, you would not have to pay them for their services.  

If you would like to use a solicitor working on a No Win No Fee basis for your claim, you can contact our advisers now to see if they could put you through to one from our panel.

Speak To Us About How To Sue An Airport 

If you want to speak to someone immediately about making a claim, our advisers are available for free initial consultations. They can give you more information on how to sue an airport and answer other questions you might have.

You can reach them now via:  

  • The number at the top of the page    
  • Our contact page    
  • The live chat feature 

Learn More About How To Sue An Airport 

For other additional information you might need: 

Civil Aviation Authority: Offers information on how to make a complaint about an airport

Government Website: Offers a guide explaining your rights at the airport

Government Website: Explains how you can request CCTV footage of yourself

You can learn more about personal injury claims from our guides:

Please get in touch with our advisers for any enquiries you might have.

Article by Mar

Edited by Fer