How To Sue A Company For An Injury

Sue A Company For An Injury

Sue A Company For An Injury

Would you like to sue a company for an injury but are unsure whether you have a legitimate case? If you’ve been injured as a result of negligence, you could be entitled to compensation. 

With this guide, we aim to explain to you how you could make a personal injury claim. Additionally, we will explore the potential evidence needed to make a successful claim.

Alternatively, if you would prefer to speak to someone about your claim, our claims team are happy to provide you with free legal advice. 

Contact us today using the details below:

About Suing A Company For An Injury

  1. How To Sue A Company For An Injury
  2. What Evidence Do I Need To Sue A Company For An Injury?
  3. Personal Injury Compensation Examples
  4. How To Sue A Company For An Injury With A No Win No Fee Solicitor
  5. Ask Our Team About How To Sue For Compensation
  6. Learn More About How To Claim For A Personal Injury

How To Sue A Company For An Injury

To be able to sue a company for an injury, you must prove that you were injured in an accident caused by someone breaching their duty of care to you. But what duty of care are you owed?
Below, we look at some of the places in which you’re owed a duty of care.

Workplace Accident Examples

When you are in the workplace or performing any duties related to your job, your employer must do everything they reasonably can to keep you safe. This is their duty of care to you, as stated in the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 (HASAWA).
Your employer should perform regular risk assessments and maintenance checks on any equipment to ensure they are doing all they reasonably can to keep you safe. If your employer were to breach this duty of care, you could become injured in a preventable accident. For example, your employer may not have been performing regular maintenance checks on the machinery at your factory job. A machine malfunctioned as you were using it, which results in you suffering from a broken forearm.

Accidents in a Public Place 

Even when you are out in a public place, such as a museum or community centre, you are owed a duty of care. The Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957 (OLA) states that anyone who is in control of a public space must do all they reasonably can to ensure that the space is safe for the public to use for its intended purposes.
If an ‘occupier’ (the party in control of a public space) were to breach this duty of care, you could become hurt. For example, a supermarket may not have sign-posted a dropped carton of milk with a ‘wet floor’ sign in an appropriate timeframe. Whilst you are there doing your weekly food shop, you slip on this spillage and suffer a broken ankle and a broken hip injury.

Regardless of whether you suffered your injury in the workplace or in public, in order to make a successful claim, you must prove that the accident happened because someone breached their duty of care to you. Furthermore, you need to show that you were injured as a result of the accident.

Call our advisors today if you are unsure whether you have a legitimate claim. If your case is valid, they could connect you with a No Win No Fee solicitor from our panel.

What Evidence Do I Need To Sue A Company For An Injury?

Evidence is important to building a valid claim if you want to sue a company for an injury. Some potential evidence you could collect to prove who was liable for your accident is:

  • Eyewitness contact details.
  • CCTV footage of the accident.
  • A completed accident report book (if applicable).
  • A copy of your medical records describing your injuries and treatments.

Additionally, you must ensure that your start your claim within the time limit set out in the Limitation Act 1980. Generally, these time limits are:

  • 3 years from the date of your injury or the date your injury was first linked to being caused by negligence.
  • If you are under 18 years old, you have 3 years from when you turn 18 unless a litigation friend claims on your behalf.
  • If someone you know lacks the mental capacity to make a claim, they have 3 years in the event that they regain their mental capacity to start their own claim, unless a litigation friend claims on their behalf.

The time limit for a litigation friend to claim for you is suspended while you’re unable to pursue your own claim. Call us today for more information on the time limits for personal injury claims.

Personal Injury Compensation Examples

Your compensation could be divided into general and special damages if you successfully sue a company for an injury.

General damages compensate you for the mental and physical harm you have suffered as a result of your injury. It also seeks to compensate you for how your quality of life was affected. However, you will need to provide evidence to make a successful claim, such as a copy of your medical records.

Special damages compensate you for the financial losses you have suffered, both past and future, as a result of the accident in which you were injured. These losses can include paying for private medical care, travel expenses and carer expenses.

Just like with general damages, you will need to provide evidence to make a successful claim. For example, invoices, receipts and bank statements could all be used as evidence for special damages.

Below, we have created a table of compensation brackets for various injuries that you may receive in general damages. These figures have been taken from the 16th edition of the Judicial College Guidelines (JCG), as it is a document many personal injury solicitors will use to help them value claims.

Since every claim is unique, the compensation you could receive will depend on your specific claim, so you should only use this table as a guide.

Injury Amount
Brain and Head Injury - (a) Very Severe£282,010 to £403,990
Injuries to the Pelvis and Hips - (a) Severe (i)£78,400 to £130,930
Knee Injuries (a) Severe (i)£69,730 to £96,210
Other Arm Injuries - (b) Serious Forearm Fracture£39,170 to £59,860
Leg Injuries - (b) Severe (iv)£27,760 to £39,200
Wrist Injuries - (b) Permanent Disability£24,500 to £39,170
Wrist Injuries - (d) Soft Tissue Injury£6,080 to £10,350
Ankle Injuries - (c) Moderate£13,740 to £26,590
Foot Injuries - (g) ModestUp to £13,740
Injuries to the Elbow - (c) ModerateUp to £12,590

Call us today to find out how much compensation you may be entitled to. If you have a valid case, you could be connected with a No Win No Fee solicitor from our panel.

How To Sue A Company For An Injury With A No Win No Fee Solicitor

If you decide to sue a company for an injury, you may want to do so with legal representation. If so, our experienced panel of solicitors may be able to take on your claim with a No Win No Fee agreement in place.

With a No Win No Fee agreement (in particular, a Conditional Fee Agreement (CFA)), there are no upfront solicitor fees to pay to start your claim or any to pay during your claim. Additionally, you won’t have to pay them for their legal services if they fail to win your claim.

However, if they do succeed in winning, you will pay them a legally capped success fee from your compensation. This is made up as a percentage of your settlement.

Call our team today for more information on how a personal injury solicitor could help you with your claim.

Ask Our Team About How To Sue For Compensation

If you still have any questions regarding how to sue a company for an injury due to negligence, our advisors are here to help. We can offer you free legal advice regarding your personal injury claim. Additionally, we can answer any questions that this guide may have not answered for you.

Contact us today via:

Learn More About How To Claim For A Personal Injury

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Contact our advisors today if you would like further guidance on how to sue a company for an injury.

Article by Rob

Edited by Sto